Till Death Do Us Part: The wisdom in love and marriage

Groucho Marx said, “I refuse to become a member of any club that’s willing to admit me”. This clever absurdism reveals the innate human tendency to desire something and yet feel unworthy of it at the same time.

It’s been such a long held, gloomy Western tradition to view marriage through a Marxist lens, that one wonders how marriage happens at all in those societies. Imagine the odds of two strangers coming into contact with each other and upon examination, incredulously find themselves so mutually compatible as to finally overcome the Marxist objection and then proceeding to subject themselves to an oscillation between the Marxist extremes of yearning to be with their loved one and longing to be rid of them. Eroding western self esteem, especially among women when it comes to marriage, has spawned chick flicks, flit lit and whole genres of beauty products and talk shows around “why you’re worth it”.

The Indian male lies at the polar opposite end of the spectrum across from the western female, and is often barges into clubs uninvited and without membership. Look no further than the typical matrimonial advertisement to find proof of complete absence of any Marxist tendency on his part. The matrimonial preferences of the Great Indian Male have evolved steadily from “caste and age” in the ‘60s and ‘70s to physical attributes “extremely fair and beautiful” in the ‘80s to ‘the physically perfect working woman’ in the ‘90s and this decade. The males themselves have been subject to lesser standards, with the “teetotaller, non smoker and broad minded” staples ruling the roost uninterrupted over the decades. Yes, serial killer you can be, but thou shalt not smoke.

Times, they are a changin’, for the Indian male. The male/female ratio in Indiahas steadily dropped over the decades. More women work now in 21st century India already compared to the entire 20th century. Still, the pool of ‘eligible women’ is so much smaller than ‘demand’ that women now call the shots in matters of matrimony. The Indian male is in dire straits and it’s not clear if he understands that.

 But, I digress. This is not about the Indian male. It’s about the wisdom of love and marriage.

Wisdom is that which arrives when we realize that we were not born with the skills to live, and embark on the journey to acquire them. The dawning of wisdom brings with it a desire to aim for tranquillity and peace and live a life devoid of anxiety and fear. It tells us to avoid the excessive enthusiasms and the pains of bitter disappointments, and that frogs don’t always turn into princes. Above all, wisdom helps us control our fears and arrests our flights from imagined shadows on the walls. It tells us that we should not fear death but we should fear fear itself.

So, what does wisdom say about matters of what the poets have called the ‘heart’? Is love like smoking which gives you pleasure but to be given up entirely? Is it like exercise to be practised with predictable regularity because it is healthy? Or is it chocolate and wine to be indulged in, when occasion calls for it? Is the contemplative worship of the divine extolled by the Vedas or the brotherly love taught by Jesus superior to the rash love of a Romeo and the crazed acts of an Othello?

The romantics will insist that love is uplifting much like music, and with enough therapy and counselling, pain and disappointment can be averted. Romeo could have met someone more suitable through cupid.com. Othello just needed to work out his aggression on a therapist’s couch. And, all Devdas needed was a stage IV intervention.

The stoics, on the other hand, will quietly aver that love is a losing game in which the players chase chimeras, and will advocate abdication of the emotion. In a rare moment of anger, they will rise up and tell us that we are destined to love only that which we don’t possess and that the acquisition of the object of desire sounds the death knell for love. They will tell us to ignore the unavoidable reality that humans were born to love. They will point out that for a man and a woman to live together day in and day out for a lifetime is one miracle that Vatican may have overlooked.

Perhaps it is wiser to view love through different lenses, and not the Marxist, romantic or stoic ones. Maybe it is simpler to view love as ‘mature’ and ‘immature’. Immature love subjects itself to the wild swings of idealization and disappointment, and finally meets its end with death or distance or both. Mature love resists idealization, and proactively appreciates the good and the bad within us and pushes for temperance. Death does not do mature love part. As veterans of marriage will put it, marriage is the process of continuously getting used to things you didn’t expect. In fact, creative arguing may just be the secret of a happy marriage. Many a young couple embarks on the journey not knowing how to argue and find their way through trial and error. But, immature love brooks no argument or compromise. And, when we refuse to argue or compromise, we put ourselves on the road to some kind of a cataclysm.

We just might begin to appreciate love when we resort neither to dogmatic optimism or a philosophy built on fear. For it is love that teaches the analytic mind an inescapable life lesson that it is analysis, and not love, that is flawed.

Wasn’t it Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart who said, “Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go into the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius”

Also, check out the infinitely funnier “For Better or For Worse”  from the Laughing Gas collection.

14 Replies to “Till Death Do Us Part: The wisdom in love and marriage”

  1. That was one intellectual piece on love that thrives on compromise and maturity, but what a thesis sirjee! Reading it, I came to the realisation for the millionth time  that I will never be in this league. And I have been writing for a looooooooong time now. (Don't ask me what I have written so long and still not qualified to enter this club. I am sure that Groucho Marx have me in mind when he said that.)

    Belated Anniversary wishes to you and your wife 🙂

  2. That was one intellectual piece on love that thrives on compromise and maturity, but what a thesis sirjee! Reading it, I came to the realisation for the millionth time  that I will never be in this league. And I have been writing for a looooooooong time now. (Don't ask me what I have written so long and still not qualified to enter this club. I am sure that Groucho Marx have me in mind when he said that.)

    Belated Anniversary wishes to you and your wife 🙂

  3. I have recently finished reading  The Sense of an Ending and some of the passages in your post acutely reminded me that amazing work by Julian Barnes.  And just as the book, I read it twice over, slowly. It is a wickedly witty and amusing post that explores love through various lenses and concludes that " it is analysis, and not love, that is flawed".  

    Forgive me, if I have failed to get it. I loved it just the same.

  4. I have recently finished reading  The Sense of an Ending and some of the passages in your post acutely reminded me that amazing work by Julian Barnes.  And just as the book, I read it twice over, slowly. It is a wickedly witty and amusing post that explores love through various lenses and concludes that " it is analysis, and not love, that is flawed".  

    Forgive me, if I have failed to get it. I loved it just the same.

  5. Thanks Umashankar. Glad you liked this piece.. You have not failed to "get it". You've summarized it very well.. The Sense of Ending sounds fascinating. Will check it out.

  6. Thanks Umashankar. Glad you liked this piece.. You have not failed to "get it". You've summarized it very well.. The Sense of Ending sounds fascinating. Will check it out.

  7. Thanks Zephyr for the anniversary wishes. As for the comment about 'never be in this league' , I fear that you may have mistaken erudition for knowing.. I've read your blog and must say that your self assessment is way off, and anyone who's reading this should check it out. But many thanks for saying what you did!

  8. Thanks Zephyr for the anniversary wishes. As for the comment about 'never be in this league' , I fear that you may have mistaken erudition for knowing.. I've read your blog and must say that your self assessment is way off, and anyone who's reading this should check it out. But many thanks for saying what you did!

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